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Miscellaneous

Community for people who cannot chose a specific community for their discussions.

Abhishek Sharma , Jul, 25 2016

WWF just paid AU$100,000 to protect the Great Barrier Reef, but its too late now as the Great Barrier Reef faces 'complete ecological collapse'.


It’s been a wretched year for Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, the largest living structure and one of the most complex natural ecosystems on Earth. The area suffered the worst bleaching event ever, one that impacted over 90 percent of the reef and killed more than a third of its corals. Earlier this year, shocking photos and video revealed total devastation in parts of the reef. Now, entire swathes of the Great Barrier Reef are suffering from “complete ecosystem collapse,” marine researcher Justin Marshall said after spending a week conducting surveys near Lizard Island in the northern region of the reef.
It’s been a wretched year for Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, the largest living structure and one of the most complex natural ecosystems on Earth. The area suffered the worst bleaching event ever, one that impacted over 90 percent of the reef and killed more than a third of its corals. Earlier this year, shocking photos and video revealed total devastation in parts of the reef. Now, entire swathes of the Great Barrier Reef are suffering from “complete ecosystem collapse,” marine researcher Justin Marshall said after spending a week conducting surveys near Lizard Island in the northern region of the reef.

abhi , Jul, 25 2016


This isnt something that one country can fix, we cant blame China, Australia or whoever the hell. We need leaders who will focus on this issue as I believe that climate change is far more important than any other issues right now. Who cares about if marijuana is legal, who cares which bathroom people are using, who cares about taxes, who cares about any of this shit when this world is gonna become more and more worse to live in in the future. We need a revolution world wide to try and fix this before it gets any later. The best time to have started would have been in the past, the second best time is right now. So what do we actually do? Do we hope people will eventually get smarter before its too late and democracy wont fail us? Do we protest in the streets? Do we do every personal thing we can and plant trees and stop using fossil fuels?
This isnt something that one country can fix, we cant blame China, Australia or whoever the hell. We need leaders who will focus on this issue as I believe that climate change is far more important than any other issues right now. Who cares about if marijuana is legal, who cares which bathroom peopl


praveen , Jul, 25 2016


Another climate catastrophe and yet we somehow think the market economy will come up with the answers. Somehow the laissez-faire, survival of the fittest approach will solve our problems. It wont. In fact the system that we have in place has zero chance of playing a part in rescuing the environment. If there is anyone out there with any vested interest in the future then we have to address this rotten context now. The wild, wacky, hippy ideas are out there and guess what thats exactly what we need. In 2008 we had a global financial meltdown that was dealt with so poorly as to be the catalyst for the shocking malaise that the world is in right now. Accelerating climate change, war, refugees etc all we have done since 2008 is revert to tribes in trenches when its patently obvious that we have to do the polar opposite! Unless I am missing a trick I would say having a viable, sustainable, quite beautiful planet to live on is fairly important to survival, not stocks, shares, pensions and the vacuous, unsustainable, debt-fuelled financial system that we currently inhabit.
Another climate catastrophe and yet we somehow think the market economy will come up with the answers. Somehow the laissez-faire, survival of the fittest approach will solve our problems. It wont. In fact the system that we have in place has zero chance of playing a part in rescuing the environment.


Shaurya Singh Khan , Jul, 25 2016


I sometimes feel that the only way to make any progress in stopping the damage we cause is to play the corporations and governments at their own game: legislature, lobbying and legal battles. Perhaps what is needed is a global team of lawyers dedicated to fighting against environmentally damaging interests such as the oil industry, and fighting for sustainability, carbon taxes and environmental protection. The issue comes down, yet again, to money. The oil industry has vast amounts of money to throw at lobbying, propaganda, "campaign donations" and even direct bribes. Public opinion is swayed away from environmental concerns by political candidates who do far to well from oil industry support. At this point with so much overwhelming evidence for climate change we see politicians resorting to sowing distrust in science and expertise as the only way to perpetuate their rhetoric. Environmental regulation doesnt capture the publics interest as it should and damaging laws get passed. So whats the solution? We have all seen crowd funding do great things, but could it really be enough? If such a movement could be professionally coordinated to ensure funds were put to proper use then maybe progress could be made. With enough determination perhaps investments from more sustainable industries would come to help fight the current monopolies, receive backing from prominent philanthropists and endorsement from green minded public figures. I havent the slightest clue how such a team could be implemented, nor whether it is feasible, but something needs to be done. I am tired of feeling powerless against short term corporate interests having such a damaging influence on laws and against regulations. Perhaps its time for a concerted effort to take the fight to them.
I sometimes feel that the only way to make any progress in stopping the damage we cause is to play the corporations and governments at their own game: legislature, lobbying and legal battles. Perhaps what is needed is a global team of lawyers dedicated to fighting against environmentally damaging in


Anamika , Jul, 25 2016


Its too late to save the majority of the reef unfortunately. The warming that has been locked in for the next couple of centuries is already too much for this delicate ecosystem to deal with. El Ninos occur every five or so years, and the coral needs at least ten years to recover. It doesnt add up. All we can do now is look long-long-longterm and hope that it can slowly rebuild if global warming trends begin to reverse in the next 20+ years—something which I am not particularly hopeful of. Knowing that this crown jewel of Australia, this natural wonder of the world cant be saved, is probably one of the more depressing realisations I have ever had. Get out and see whats left of it while you can. I will leave you with a quote from Sir David Attenborough:Do we really care so little about the earth on which we live that we dont want to protect one of the worlds greatest wonders from the consequences of our behaviour?
Its too late to save the majority of the reef unfortunately. The warming that has been locked in for the next couple of centuries is already too much for this delicate ecosystem to deal with. El Ninos occur every five or so years, and the coral needs at least ten years to recover. It doesnt add up.


Ajay , Jul, 25 2016


It is no wonder we have high levels of despair, anxiety, depression and suicide in our young population. On top of rising youth unemployment, higher education fees, lower wages in part time jobs and no hope of owning their own homes, their legacy of dying ecosystems and distressing oppressive heating of the atmosphere is a devastating inheritance. Where is the fairness in this ripping off of the future generations. Why do we not have a superannuation scheme for our planets inhabitants of the future to pay for our willful damage to the planet? What excuse do we have when we know there are solutions yet we elect mindless people who will continue the senseless plunder and brutal extinctions with little thought for the future? Young people of Australia if you want a future it is time to rise up and speak out against this massive injustice and demand your right to a life. Demand a future and demand fairness from Government. Stop voting the same as your parents because now is the only time to save your human rights.
It is no wonder we have high levels of despair, anxiety, depression and suicide in our young population. On top of rising youth unemployment, higher education fees, lower wages in part time jobs and no hope of owning their own homes, their legacy of dying ecosystems and distressing oppressive heatin


Adarsh , Jul, 25 2016


I am very pessimistic about our ability as a species to change our very negative impact on our environment. This is simply because we actually have far less ability to influence ourselves or each other than we, politicians or anyone else who has a vested interest in claiming to be an influencer would like us to believe. We are very much ruled by the ways our brains and reward systems evolved which is why one can read Greek poetry from 2500 years ago and have it be immediately relatable. The fundamental challenges of being human change far more slowly than our technology does. Think about it this way, its really in our best interests as a species to not kill one another but even in modern day times we find ourselves unable to navigate our fears or ambitions with sufficient success to avoid wars and human on human violence. Most folks find it extremely difficult to even navigate the need to eat healthily and shortcut their brains desire for calories and energy. Now if we cant successfully prevent ourselves from eating junk in a way that destroys our basic health something that is so immediately visceral for us how are we going to motivate ourselves to not gorge out on natural resources and exploiting our environment to meet our needs?
I am very pessimistic about our ability as a species to change our very negative impact on our environment. This is simply because we actually have far less ability to influence ourselves or each other than we, politicians or anyone else who has a vested interest in claiming to be an influencer woul


Aarushi , Jul, 25 2016


When we hear about these localised effects of early climate change, we are often hearing demands for localised solutions. Things like "Australia needs to do something about this" or "Australia shouldnt have opened a fished the reef/put chemicals into the sea" and hey, I will be the first person to admit Australias action on climate change has been beyond pitiful, but we need to get something straight, this bleaching event is caused by extreme ocean warming. The ocean circulates around the entire planet, the GBR is 344000km squared; it is impossible for "chemicals" or "mining" or "fishing" to have caused this. It is caused by warming. The Great Barrier Reef is dying because the planet is growing horrifyingly, rapidly hotter. We are seeing the effects of climate change across the globe. Whining about what Australia is doing wrong is just a way of disclaiming any level of personal responsibility on the part of other nations. Demanding Australia fix this is like demanding Greenland stop melting glaciers, or tiny pacific islands stop rising seas, or saying "Siberia needs to do something about all their melting permafrost". It is an utterly daft and unreasonable position to take, and it isnt helping. Global warming has caused this and only a global effort will fix it.
When we hear about these localised effects of early climate change, we are often hearing demands for localised solutions. Things like "Australia needs to do something about this" or "Australia shouldnt have opened a fished the reef/put chemicals into the sea" and hey, I will be the first person to a


Prateek , Jul, 25 2016


One of the reasons is definitely related to human influence, but its not what you think. Crown-of-thorns starfish breed in the south and migrate north to the reef along currents. A small amount of these things are fine and mostly help trim down any coral overgrowth, but an outbreak of them can causes absolute havoc. They destroy entire reefs, one after another. Even worse, if you cut any of their arms off to try and kill them, the arm regrows and the cut arm grows four more, ta-da, two starfish. These fuckers range from being a few millimetres in length to the length of your forearm. The only way to actually kill them is to physically inject them with poison, one by one. We are about to face, or are even witnessing the beginning of, a huge outbreak. There have recently been several floods in the south which have washed a huge amounts of nutrients from farmland into rivers leading to the Tasman Sea, resulting in the water being much more nutritious allowing more starfish to grow. The current mortality rate has seen them go from the a very low 0.01% or so reaching adulthood to some ridiculous number like 40 or 50%.
One of the reasons is definitely related to human influence, but its not what you think. Crown-of-thorns starfish breed in the south and migrate north to the reef along currents. A small amount of these things are fine and mostly help trim down any coral overgrowth, but an outbreak of them can cause