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Nikita Nain , Seeks vibrancy in life Oct, 09 2016

Will legalizing trade in ivory or Rhino horn be sensible to deter criminal gangs from poaching the giants?


The recent Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) held in Sandton, Johannesburg was the most vigorously attended, majorly to debate whether trade in ivory or Rhino horn should be made legal? There are contentions, especially from African countries, that they are being made to follow laws made by Western countries that do not suit their situation. A common argument in favor is that the Rhino horn regrows like hair or nails and so it can be sold commercially, instead of poaching the animals for their valuable assets. The contenders to the demand claim that demand for these can be widely unpredictable and legalizing the trade will be a ticket to accelerated extinction.
The recent Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) held in Sandton, Johannesburg was the most vigorously attended, majorly to debate whether trade in ivory or Rhino horn should be made legal? There are contentions, especially from African countries, that they are being made to follow laws made by Western countries that do not suit their situation. A common argument in favor is that the Rhino horn regrows like hair or nails and so it can be sold commercially, instead of poaching the animals for their valuable assets. The contenders to the demand claim that demand for these can be widely unpredictable and legalizing the trade will be a ticket to accelerated extinction.

Suhani Singh , Inquisitive snobbish arrogant. I am Golum and Oct, 09 2016


Legalising of ivory has been done, until the 1904 ivory was legal to sell on the open market. In central Africa the biggest trader was a Liverpool based company. At the time local people did not benefit from the trade, even when colonial administrations forced companies to help in local development. Furthermore, research carried out in 2006, has shown that any money raised by governments from taxing the sale of wildlife products does not cover the cost needed to police this sale, even in the UK the sale of hunting permits does not cover the administrative and policing cost.

Legalising of ivory has been done, until the 1904 ivory was legal to sell on the open market. In central Africa the biggest trader was a Liverpool based company. At the time local people did not benefit from the trade, even when colonial administrations forced companies to help in local development.


Akhilesh Agarwal , Oct, 09 2016


Elephants can survive without tusks. While most elephants have tusks, female Asian elephants don't have any, and some male Asian elephants are born without tusks. Removing an elephant's tusk completely up to its skull can be extremely painful for the animal and can lead death. The tusks are elongated incisors in the elephant's upper jaw and are connected to the animal's skull. The extraction of the tusk means taking a large chunk out of the animal's face and digging into the skull, which can cause profuse bleeding and death. Trimming the tusk doesn't kill an elephant but prevents it from digging for food and defending itself from predators until the tusk grows back on its own.

Elephants can survive without tusks. While most elephants have tusks, female Asian elephants don't have any, and some male Asian elephants are born without tusks. Removing an elephant's tusk completely up to its skull can be extremely painful for the animal and can lead death. The tusks are elongate


Aman Rawal , Geek by profession, Deep interest in science Oct, 09 2016


Argument to check a crime by making it legal is a failed idea. It happens only when people in power want the crime to continue.


Nikita Nain , Seeks vibrancy in life Oct, 09 2016


Isn't like it the Prohibition that we keep trying to impose to ban sale of liquor, when everyone truly knows that it is just a front to make black money and fund elections? When legal sale of liquor is considered a better alternative to the shadowed , back-alley sales of unregulated liquor, is legalizing the trade of horns or ivory not sensible on those lines?
Isn't like it the Prohibition that we keep trying to impose to ban sale of liquor, when everyone truly knows that it is just a front to make black money and fund elections? When legal sale of liquor is considered a better alternative to the shadowed , back-alley sales of unregulated liquor, is legal


Himanshu Shekhar , Studying Computer Science in MIT Pune Oct, 09 2016


Legalizing any product or service has the possibility of reducing illicit activity associated with it, but it only works when the demand for what the illicit/illegal trade was based on can be satisfied with products/services produced legally. The problem with trade in endangered species and their body parts - rhino horn, elephant ivory, bear gall bladders etc. - is that the demand for them is typically too large to be satisfied via legalized production. Rhinos both reproduce and re-grow their horns slowly. Being very large animals, they also take a lot of space and resources to maintain. When the legal supply of a product or service cannot keep up with demand, it can backfire by actually increasing that demand, the supply for which tends to be then supplied by illegal means.

The bigger picture is that there is currently no magic bullet or cure for the illegal killing of wildlife for financial gain. Right now, the best scenario is that we must invest in both escalating existing anti-poaching methods - tracking/ apprehending/punishing poachers, improving the livelihood of those living near threatened wildlife, developing programs so that wildlife is seen as a local asset and not a burden etc. - combined with developing future methods: the cyber-tracking of dealers in endangered species parts, new monitoring technologies like drones and other methods yet to be innovated.

Legalizing any product or service has the possibility of reducing illicit activity associated with it, but it only works when the demand for what the illicit/illegal trade was based on can be satisfied with products/services produced legally. The problem with trade in endangered species and their bo


Sakshi Sharma , Freelancer Designer Oct, 09 2016


Legalising Rhino Horn trade does not reduce poaching of wild rhinos at all.

1. An ignored fact is that the percentage of rhino horn users in Vietnam (the chief consumer of horn) is less than 0.1% (89,000) - legalisation will increase this number beyond the point of no return.

2. Legalisation will sabotage demand reduction efforts, as the very nature of trade is to increase demand through marketing.

Legalising Rhino Horn trade does not reduce poaching of wild rhinos at all. 1. An ignored fact is that the percentage of rhino horn users in Vietnam (the chief consumer of horn) is less than 0.1% (89,000) - legalisation will increase this number beyond the point of no return. 2. Legalisation will sa