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Finance and Economics

Central hub for discussion on Finance & economics

Suhani Singh , Inquisitive snobbish arrogant. I am Golum and Jul, 28 2016

We will soon witness another Collapse like that of Lehman Brothers


Italian banks are in “trouble” because of their “large stock of bad loans” QNB said although it does not foresee the trouble “spilling over” to the wider global economy. The share prices of Italian banks collapsed following the UK’s decision to leave the European Union (EU). They are now trading more than 50% below their value at the beginning of 2016, QNB said in an economic commentary. While Brexit could be partially blamed, as it is expected to trigger global monetary easing, which is typically bad for banks’ profitability, the problem runs a bit deeper. The balance sheet of Italian banks is loaded with bad loans. Attempts by the government to solve this problem by capitalising the banking system are running into legal hurdles imposed by new Euro Area rules. “We expect Italy and the rest of the Euro Area to reach an agreement that is broadly consistent with rules. We do not foresee the trouble with Italian banks spilling over to the wider global economy,” QNB said. Italian banks are in trouble as their main problem is the large stock of bad loans, QNB points out.
Italian banks are in “trouble” because of their “large stock of bad loans” QNB said although it does not foresee the trouble “spilling over” to the wider global economy. The share prices of Italian banks collapsed following the UK’s decision to leave the European Union (EU). They are now trading more than 50% below their value at the beginning of 2016, QNB said in an economic commentary. While Brexit could be partially blamed, as it is expected to trigger global monetary easing, which is typically bad for banks’ profitability, the problem runs a bit deeper. The balance sheet of Italian banks is loaded with bad loans. Attempts by the government to solve this problem by capitalising the banking system are running into legal hurdles imposed by new Euro Area rules. “We expect Italy and the rest of the Euro Area to reach an agreement that is broadly consistent with rules. We do not foresee the trouble with Italian banks spilling over to the wider global economy,” QNB said. Italian banks are in trouble as their main problem is the large stock of bad loans, QNB points out.

Tarun Singh , Jul, 29 2016


We all know the Eurozone debt crisis was never properly resolved. In fact most Eurozone banks have been making it far worse by continuing to buy up state debt, becoming too dependent on countries to economically perform, and countries have become too dependent on the banks to buy up their debts its a catch 22 position. This is the situation Italy now find itself in. The E.U has made noises as to reforming this by trying to introduce a ceiling on banks holdings of state debt but as you all well know nothing is done quickly in the E.U because of so many conflicting interests. In this case its Italy PM Mr Renzi who blocks any such reform because he wants to get his own way with bank bailouts. Reforms at this stage are meaningless anyway, Italy looks absolutely doomed because 1)Theres absolutely no confidence in their system, 2)the necessary restructuring during the height of the eurozone debt crisis were never implemented and 3) the banks need Italys economy to get out of the gutter. No chance.
We all know the Eurozone debt crisis was never properly resolved. In fact most Eurozone banks have been making it far worse by continuing to buy up state debt, becoming too dependent on countries to economically perform, and countries have become too dependent on the banks to buy up their debts its


Manav garg , Jul, 29 2016


It doesnt matter how much gold or precious art or properties you have if your debt is worth 10 times the value of your treasure. And this is a pro Europe italian speaking, one that thinks that Brexit was a knee-jeck strategic mistake for the UK (with impact on the EU as a whole of course but mostly for the UK. A country that mistakenly thinks that because it was competitive against other EU countries within the EU protected pond, it is also a big fish in the asian or american open oceans). Oh yes Italy is in deep banking shit and faces a lasting recession (also mainly due to really bad domestic policy management for at least a full generation by the Italians themselves. Not even Brussels can save idiots from themselves, and the italian democracy put some really corrupt idiots in power in Italy). Actually the solution for Italy, which would never be accepted of course, would be to fire the entire parliament and government and civil service and import Dutch, Germans and Danes to administer the country for a few years.
It doesnt matter how much gold or precious art or properties you have if your debt is worth 10 times the value of your treasure. And this is a pro Europe italian speaking, one that thinks that Brexit was a knee-jeck strategic mistake for the UK (with impact on the EU as a whole of course but mostly


praneet singh , Jul, 29 2016


Spanish banks are also still looking shaky and a new recession soon is forecast. The EU like a chicken without a head is demanding a huge new austerity programme (as if peoples expectations hadnt already been crushed) and socially this may not be acceptable. The welfare state may not survive a new austerity drive. Imposed heavy centralisation is already clawing back local autonomy. Spains already going on for a year with no government, with 2 failed elections and a third likely as mediocre politicians put party before country. A third election will deliver another far right majority and social unrest, certainly stimulating independence movements, above all in Catalonia. Could it end up with a EU imposed president and externally enforced impoverishment? Noone knows how the so-called new parties will fare, will extremism start to appear? So far no Spexit in view.
Spanish banks are also still looking shaky and a new recession soon is forecast. The EU like a chicken without a head is demanding a huge new austerity programme (as if peoples expectations hadnt already been crushed) and socially this may not be acceptable. The welfare state may not survive a new a