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International

Place to discuss every international news/issue.

Ashat , Oct, 01 2016

There Will Be No Peace in Syria if Assad is Isolated


To be able to settle the Syrian crisis, the major players in the region should establish a dialogue with President Assad. If Turkey, Iran, Russia, the US and the Syrian authorities insisted on the need to protect Syria's territorial integrity, they should unite their efforts at the negotiation table to be able to find an effective solution to the crisis

To be able to settle the Syrian crisis, the major players in the region should establish a dialogue with President Assad. If Turkey, Iran, Russia, the US and the Syrian authorities insisted on the need to protect Syria's territorial integrity, they should unite their efforts at the negotiation table to be able to find an effective solution to the crisis

Vassal Shergil , Oct, 01 2016


A victory of the Syrian Government is the only sure path to rebuilding Syria. It is that or a divided country at continuos war, with foreign head choppers playing 21st Century crusaders funded by Saudi Arabia and other wahhabi absolute rulers backed by Nato, who wants that? Attack the terrorists. That's the terrorists who drop bombs on hospitals, aid convoys and innocent civilians. Yes, that involves actually direct conflict with Russia and Putin's puppet in Damascus, but if you want a resolution to these war crimes, that is it.

A victory of the Syrian Government is the only sure path to rebuilding Syria. It is that or a divided country at continuos war, with foreign head choppers playing 21st Century crusaders funded by Saudi Arabia and other wahhabi absolute rulers backed by Nato, who wants that? Attack the terrorists. Th


Vivek , Wonder Oct, 01 2016


Syria is no longer a straight foreward civil war as there are too many outside players with vested interests in the outcome. It is to all intent and purpose a proxy war being fought on behalf of regional and global powers. Only when one of them has achieved their ambition will there be a chance of peace.
Syria is no longer a straight foreward civil war as there are too many outside players with vested interests in the outcome. It is to all intent and purpose a proxy war being fought on behalf of regional and global powers. Only when one of them has achieved their ambition will there be a chance of p


Akhilesh Agarwal , Oct, 01 2016


Turkey is not some kind of benign neutral power in Syria. It has been supporting rebel factions, including Isis, for years. But its overriding concern, as you are aware, is keeping the Kurds in check and any deal between the west and Turkey that leads to it playing a larger role in Syria will inevitably involve selling out our Kurdish allies. Is that a price worth paying? It seems unlikely.

How's this for an alternative suggestion? The US puts sustained pressure on its Middle Eastern allies (Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Turkey) to order their clients, the jihadists, in Aleppo to leave the city and at the same time demands that Russia and the Syrian army hold back while humanitarian relief work is being carried out there. By restraining their counterparts, both hegemonic powers will be able to demonstrate good faith. Most commentators, including whoever writes the Guardian editorials, seem to think of the standoff in terms of a zero/sum game; either Russia and Assad must be brought to heel or the US allies must be. This approach can only lead to continue deadlock with an unfortunate emphasis upon the first part of that word.

Turkey is not some kind of benign neutral power in Syria. It has been supporting rebel factions, including Isis, for years. But its overriding concern, as you are aware, is keeping the Kurds in check and any deal between the west and Turkey that leads to it playing a larger role in Syria will inevit