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Education

Participate in meaningful, reflective, and thought-provoking discourse about educational policy, research, policy and everything else related to education.

Vijay Arur , Sep, 16 2016

Home schooling should be encouraged in India to provide better education to children


A somnolent 50 years or so after Independence, India woke up to its primary school deficit. Since then, the quantity problem in primary education is being tackled. The Annual Status of Education Report (ASER)—a household survey—put out by Pratham is a consistent and excellent source of information on the quantity and quality of primary education in India. It has been conducted annually since 2004, and covers more than 90% of India’s districts in a statistically rigorous manner. The ASER trends-over-time report that covers the period 2006 to 2014, points to a decline in children not enrolled from about 4% at the beginning of the period to about 2% now. It shows a steady increase in the number of children enrolled in private schools from about 20% to a little over 30% over the period. The trends in quality measured in reading, arithmetic and English are disconcerting. For instance, children in Class III who can read at least a Class I text has dropped consistently from about 50% to about 40% and children in Class III who can do at least subtraction has dropped from 40% to 25%.

A somnolent 50 years or so after Independence, India woke up to its primary school deficit. Since then, the quantity problem in primary education is being tackled. The Annual Status of Education Report (ASER)—a household survey—put out by Pratham is a consistent and excellent source of information on the quantity and quality of primary education in India. It has been conducted annually since 2004, and covers more than 90% of India’s districts in a statistically rigorous manner. The ASER trends-over-time report that covers the period 2006 to 2014, points to a decline in children not enrolled from about 4% at the beginning of the period to about 2% now. It shows a steady increase in the number of children enrolled in private schools from about 20% to a little over 30% over the period. The trends in quality measured in reading, arithmetic and English are disconcerting. For instance, children in Class III who can read at least a Class I text has dropped consistently from about 50% to about 40% and children in Class III who can do at least subtraction has dropped from 40% to 25%.

Ritesh Aggarwal , Sep, 16 2016


Its a great idea as the coursework,content etc can be designed based on the needs and level of understanding of students. It allows student to innovate and helps in creative thinking by going beyond defined contours of learning. In the process discourages rote learning. Also it puts a lot less stress on already stressed education system. Here the parents takes ups the responsibility to guide.

Its a great idea as the coursework,content etc can be designed based on the needs and level of understanding of students. It allows student to innovate and helps in creative thinking by going beyond defined contours of learning. In the process discourages rote learning. Also it puts a lot less stres


Manav garg , Sep, 16 2016


Though home education is nobel concept and help to bridge the gap between illiterate & literate India but it lack proper frame work and skill contrains. India has huge demographic divident and also IT hub. It can utilize the digital technologies like edustat ,peneratration distance learning programme at affordable cost, volunteer initiative for community schooling with help of NGOs and government etc can help to improve the quality of home schooling in India. In addition to this changes in admission procedure in higher institute for inclusion of home school students should be done. Still Home education is only seen as supplementary to the regular school programmes and not as alternative.

Though home education is nobel concept and help to bridge the gap between illiterate & literate India but it lack proper frame work and skill contrains. India has huge demographic divident and also IT hub. It can utilize the digital technologies like edustat ,peneratration distance learning programm


praveen , Sep, 16 2016


Currently state run schools facing the low, due to the poor pupil to teacher ratio, the poor pedagogy qualities and the poor infrastructure standards. Thus most of the families even lower middle class one prefer private institution over state led. Due to high demand of private institution they demanding high charges for that. And making the necessary education very dear.
But hinterlands, where private education is not present, their children have to face poor standards of education , according to ASER report, class 5 student can’t solve basic mathematics and unable to comprehend English of class 2 level. Thus Community schooling can be seen as solution, where locality arranges the facilities, to provide better education to their children

Currently state run schools facing the low, due to the poor pupil to teacher ratio, the poor pedagogy qualities and the poor infrastructure standards. Thus most of the families even lower middle class one prefer private institution over state led. Due to high demand of private institution they deman


Rohit pande , Have a view on many things but happy to thras Sep, 16 2016


Yes, data is alarming is well known by now. But is home-schooling a viable alternative ? Given that the maximum gap in learning is for first gen learners of poor parents, the educated well-off children already get the best of both worlds - relatively better private schools + parental involvement