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Nilesh Pathak , Pursuing MS, CMU Oct, 12 2016

Has there ever been a civilization that evolved without a religion?


The civilisations we learn about are - to different extents - defined by the religion(s) it's people or leaders followed/practiced. It seems like you can't stray too far into the stories of a civilisation before religion pops up.

So I was simply wondering if there are/were any cases where religion wasn't really popular and so didn't play a part in the history of said civilisation/society?

The civilisations we learn about are - to different extents - defined by the religion(s) it's people or leaders followed/practiced. It seems like you can't stray too far into the stories of a civilisation before religion pops up. So I was simply wondering if there are/were any cases where religion wasn't really popular and so didn't play a part in the history of said civilisation/society?

Rajesh Srivastava , Data Analyst. Traveler. Pink Floyd Fan Foreve Oct, 13 2016


Pretty sure East Asia civilizations never had religion over monarchy, so none of this Pope telling you what to do. East Asia countries were never followers of any religion that's overbearing and controlling people's lives.


S.N Raman , learning, hope to be more aware :) PhD schola Oct, 13 2016


This is totally false, not to be blunt or anything.

East Asian cultures enjoyed highly developed animistic traditions before the introduction of Hinduism, later Buddhism spread throughout the area. In Dai Viet the Chinese brought their religious doctrines, and eventually Confucianism took root.

If you study Southeast Asian history you will see that it is much more fascinating and complex than most realize. I am currently studying it at University and I'm always blown away by how little the West cares for Southeast Asian civilizations.

This is totally false, not to be blunt or anything. East Asian cultures enjoyed highly developed animistic traditions before the introduction of Hinduism, later Buddhism spread throughout the area. In Dai Viet the Chinese brought their religious doctrines, and eventually Confucianism took root. If y


Sakshi Sharma , Freelancer Designer Oct, 13 2016


Civilization between Indus and Himalayas had no notion of religion as such. Hindusm was no religion, it was just a way of life. People in this great culture were not bound by any specific rules. There were just ways of life which people followed because they enjoyed it and attained liberation.


Aman Rawal , Geek by profession, Deep interest in science Oct, 12 2016


No, and there's no transhistorical and transcultural concept of "religion".

Wanted to disagree, pressed agree by mistake.



Rohit pande , Have a view on many things but happy to thras Oct, 12 2016


A barely related aside. Is atheism as a trend growing in the world. ?


Aman Rawal , Geek by profession, Deep interest in science Oct, 12 2016


It certainly is. Like vegans atheism is the next growing trend.


Rajesh Agarwal , Chief Engineer, Honda Motor Company Oct, 12 2016


Well, in China, religion was important, but the State did not have a powerful priest class, instead it followed Confucianism, which was a sort of ancestor worship combined with a focus on the family and social harmony, and on virtue and ethics based on appeals to reason, rather than "do this because that's how the Gods like it"

But there was plenty of Taoism or Buddhism for those interested in religion. I'd just say that the "Gods" didn't hold a lot of sway.

Well, in China, religion was important, but the State did not have a powerful priest class, instead it followed Confucianism, which was a sort of ancestor worship combined with a focus on the family and social harmony, and on virtue and ethics based on appeals to reason, rather than "do this because