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Science and Technology

Here we discuss, well, everything science! That includes research, new discoveries, applications of science in the world, science policy, Technology and innovation

aarth dhar , Sep, 27 2016

Driverless cars are the new revolution or just a futuristic hope


The clear messages from these developments are, first, that this technology will become mainstream much faster than people expected, and second, that the US government wants it to happen as soon as possible. (Nearly 100 people die every day on US roads.) Transport planning is about to get really interesting again. And we might even be able to reclaim our streets from all those empty, idle parked cars.

The clear messages from these developments are, first, that this technology will become mainstream much faster than people expected, and second, that the US government wants it to happen as soon as possible. (Nearly 100 people die every day on US roads.) Transport planning is about to get really interesting again. And we might even be able to reclaim our streets from all those empty, idle parked cars.

Mrinal chatterjee , Sep, 27 2016


The driverless car lobby tactic is to say these are coming fast. A trial of driverless bus in Switzerland has been cancelled as it crashed into a parked car. Thankfully it wasn't a child.

It is a pointless and dangerous technology that distracts from the real issue of minimising motorised transport in our cities and elsewhere to cut CO2 , reduce obesity and create environments for people to walk and cycle safely. Cyclists are 'difficult' for robots. These 'mobile couch potatoes' produce high carbon emissions in production. Half ton lithium batteries are very damaging to the environment. They can be hacked, software is unstable and can be rigged as seen in diesel gate.

The driverless car lobby tactic is to say these are coming fast. A trial of driverless bus in Switzerland has been cancelled as it crashed into a parked car. Thankfully it wasn't a child. It is a pointless and dangerous technology that distracts from the real issue of minimising motorised transpo


Vassal Shergil , Sep, 27 2016


The driverless car romance is hot right now. Pretty soon we'll find it is not cracked up to be what it promises. Many of the arguments for their introduction don't write ring true. There will bear fewer cars on the road, they claim, because we'll only have a car when we need one. Ok, so what happens in the peak hour rush?
Right now it's a bit like when the emerging nuclear power industry claimed that 'energy will be so cheap it won't be worth monitoring it'. On the onset of computers they claimed we would have paperless offices. When schools got computers driven photocopiers usage of paper in schools went up thirty fold.

The driverless car romance is hot right now. Pretty soon we'll find it is not cracked up to be what it promises. Many of the arguments for their introduction don't write ring true. There will bear fewer cars on the road, they claim, because we'll only have a car when we need one. Ok, so what happens


manoj , Sep, 27 2016


In the not distant future all vehicles will be required to be driverless in order to remove error prone humans from behind the wheel so that road deaths will become as infrequent as death by shark attacks.
Already electronic stability control is compulsory in all new passenger vehicles sold in Australia and elsewhere. Such devices have been shown to reduce single occupant deaths by half and that is just the start. Collision avoidance, automatic braking, lane keeping, GPS speed control and other devices are available as options on expensive up-market models such as Audis. Before long these systems will become standard and when that happens governments will start to enforce their installation in all new vehicles while GPS speed controls will probably be retro-fitted to vehicles driven by anyone under 25 or who loses their licence for speeding. Of course road freight will eventually disappear since stability control is probably not practical for articulated trucks and anyway measures to reduce toxic emissions from diesel engines will restrict their use.

In the not distant future all vehicles will be required to be driverless in order to remove error prone humans from behind the wheel so that road deaths will become as infrequent as death by shark attacks. Already electronic stability control is compulsory in all new passenger vehicles sold in Aust


Bhimesh , Sep, 27 2016


I don't doubt there are some who would give up their car willingly but I suspect most people will not. The convenience of having your car parked right out front with no ordering even if just a click.
It's public transport - there will be crumbs on the seats and rubbish on the floor. Or worse, given it's a private space. Lots of people see driving as a right and a pleasure and their car as a status symbol even part of their personality. I like the idea of driverless and cheap taxis like this are a good option but fewer cars will be seen by many as a way to park closer to their house.

I don't doubt there are some who would give up their car willingly but I suspect most people will not. The convenience of having your car parked right out front with no ordering even if just a click. It's public transport - there will be crumbs on the seats and rubbish on the floor. Or worse, given