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Shanu Sharma , Preparing for IIT, confused and dazzled about Oct, 31 2016

Do you think women reservation in Panchayats is effective?


According to a data in The Hindu: "Women in the village with the female sarpanch are in a better condition than their counterparts in the village governed by a male sarpanch regarding certain aspects of public life. Therefore, we cannot entirely rule out the possibility of the female sarpanch’s influence. On the other hand, our experiences in the village show that we cannot attribute these differences to her gender either as it appeared from all accounts that her son was ruling by proxy. We, therefore, differ from both the existing positions in the literature, and argue, instead, that the effect of a female sarpanch on the delivery of public services is complicated by several factors aside from gender — namely caste, family background, geographical location, and the broader economic situation. This then calls for a more holistic, qualitative framework to understand the ways in which various social systems intersect and affect a female sarpanch’s influence on the delivery of public services."
According to a data in The Hindu: "Women in the village with the female sarpanch are in a better condition than their counterparts in the village governed by a male sarpanch regarding certain aspects of public life. Therefore, we cannot entirely rule out the possibility of the female sarpanch’s influence. On the other hand, our experiences in the village show that we cannot attribute these differences to her gender either as it appeared from all accounts that her son was ruling by proxy. We, therefore, differ from both the existing positions in the literature, and argue, instead, that the effect of a female sarpanch on the delivery of public services is complicated by several factors aside from gender — namely caste, family background, geographical location, and the broader economic situation. This then calls for a more holistic, qualitative framework to understand the ways in which various social systems intersect and affect a female sarpanch’s influence on the delivery of public services."