Login

Sign up

OR

Can't sign in? Did you forget your password?

x

Login


If you don’t have an account, click right here


Can't Sign in? Did you forget your password?

x

Please fill in these details

to create your profile


Click on the image to upload your profile pic

x
x

At Awaremonk, I hereby pledge that

I will not troll or abuse any member of the community.
I will be a good listener.
I will check my facts before stating them and attribute them as well.

x

Forgot Password?

Enter your email and we shall mail you the password reset link

x

Reset Password

Enter new password and confirm password

x

Islam

Place to discuss about Islam

Ahmed Azab , Interested in history, Political science and Oct, 08 2016

Difference between a conservative Muslim, Islamist, and Jihadist? What do awaremonks think?


I have recently finished the book "ISLAM AND THE FUTURE OF TOLERANCE" written by Sam Harris & Maajid Nawaz, this really educated me on some terms which are generally thrown around without understanding them. Here is how both authors describe the different terms (although they do disagree on the percentages of Muslims in each group). Imagine a large circle which encompasses all Muslims, inside this circle are ever smaller concentric circles. Conservative Muslims: Literalist Muslims within their own families and lifestyles. Islamists: Are conservative Muslims who want political Islam imposed on society. Jihadists: Are Islamists who use force. Islamic Terrorists: Are Jihadists who also target non-combatants.
I have recently finished the book "ISLAM AND THE FUTURE OF TOLERANCE" written by Sam Harris & Maajid Nawaz, this really educated me on some terms which are generally thrown around without understanding them. Here is how both authors describe the different terms (although they do disagree on the percentages of Muslims in each group). Imagine a large circle which encompasses all Muslims, inside this circle are ever smaller concentric circles. Conservative Muslims: Literalist Muslims within their own families and lifestyles. Islamists: Are conservative Muslims who want political Islam imposed on society. Jihadists: Are Islamists who use force. Islamic Terrorists: Are Jihadists who also target non-combatants.

Malik , An engineer turned into a student of conflict Oct, 08 2016


conservative Muslims: are most Muslims

Islamists: Muslim brotherhood

Jihadists: JAI

Terrorists: ISIS

One also has to also distinguish between Global and Regional Jihadists. The Taliban for example would be Regional Islamic Terrorists whereas Al Qaeda would be Global.



Syed Raza , In the quest of truth. Oct, 08 2016


I take issue with "conservative Muslims" definition. This is an EXTREMELY loose category and can cover a wide spectrum. One can be conservative in their application of Islam but not be an extremist.

You probably need a working definition of extremist before you toss it about like that. To me, extremist means someone willing to engage in or support terror violence.

Just being an extremely conservative Muslim doesn't mean you wish to engage in acts of terror or even support them.


Minhaaj Rehman I would like you to have your opinion here.
I take issue with "conservative Muslims" definition. This is an EXTREMELY loose category and can cover a wide spectrum. One can be conservative in their application of Islam but not be an extremist. You probably need a working definition of extremist before you toss it about like that. To me, extrem


Ahmed Azab , Interested in history, Political science and Oct, 08 2016


Extremist for me means that they believe the Qur'an word for word. Sorry I should have specified that.


Sameer Raza , Learning. Student forever. Oct, 08 2016


Did it address that in the book? This would be an interesting discussion since it's generally accepted within Islam that the Qur'an was conveyed to Muhammad verbatim, and is considered his 'miracle'. Obviously that still leaves all manner of possible interpretations because it's so contradictory, but believing in the divine truth of the Qur'an (and thus its words) is an almost definitive aspect of being a Muslim.
Did it address that in the book? This would be an interesting discussion since it's generally accepted within Islam that the Qur'an was conveyed to Muhammad verbatim, and is considered his 'miracle'. Obviously that still leaves all manner of possible interpretations because it's so contradictory, bu