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Tibet

Community to discuss Tibet issue in detail. Bringing out the problems faced and seeking solutions and support.

Suhani Singh , Inquisitive snobbish arrogant. I am Golum and Sep, 13 2016

Cultural roots of Tibet


Is the Tibetan culture more closely associated to India or to China? Or does it have its own unique identity entirely? As per what I've read, everything indicates a stronger Indian influence than Chinese.


Bhimesh , Sep, 13 2016


China. Because Tibet Buddhism came from China.

The founder of the Tibetan Empire, Songtsen Gampo (618-649) married a Chinese Tang Dynasty Buddhist princess, Wencheng, who came to Tibet with a statue of Shakyamuni Buddha. (The beginning of Buddhism in Tibet). Traditional accounts say that, during the reign of Songtsen Gampo, examples of handicrafts and astrological systems were imported from China and the Western Xia; the dharma and the art of writing came from India; material wealth and treasures from the Nepalis and the lands of the Mongols, while model laws and administration were imported from the Uyghurs of the Turkic Khaganate to the North.

China. Because Tibet Buddhism came from China. The founder of the Tibetan Empire, Songtsen Gampo (618-649) married a Chinese Tang Dynasty Buddhist princess, Wencheng, who came to Tibet with a statue of Shakyamuni Buddha. (The beginning of Buddhism in Tibet). Traditional accounts say that, during


Vassal Shergil , Sep, 13 2016


On comparison, definitely India more than China. Something as evident as language and writing can show us the similarities. If we look at the consonants of Tibetan: it has ka, kha, ga. This is the manner (mostly) Indian languages arrange their consonants. The system where consonants are written and vowels marks added (matras) is technically called abugida, and is also used in all Indian languages . Look at the famous Sanskrit chanting Om Mani Padme Hum in both the languages and observe the similarity of their Brahmi scripts.

On comparison, definitely India more than China. Something as evident as language and writing can show us the similarities. If we look at the consonants of Tibetan: it has ka, kha, ga. This is the manner (mostly) Indian languages arrange their consonants. The system where consonants are written and


manoj , Sep, 13 2016


Like many Indian languages, first Tibetan grammars were in Sanskrit and the language was used extensively in texts. A typical Buddhist manuscript has Sanskrit text on top and Tibetan below. One of the Panchen Lamas is said to have recited the complete “Perfection of Wisdom Sutra in Eight Thousand Lines” (Prajnaparamita) in Sanskrit from memory. It must be said that though Sanskrit influenced Tibetan, Tibetan language doesn’t use full Sanskrit phrases in the way Javanese or Thai languages do.

Like many Indian languages, first Tibetan grammars were in Sanskrit and the language was used extensively in texts. A typical Buddhist manuscript has Sanskrit text on top and Tibetan below. One of the Panchen Lamas is said to have recited the complete “Perfection of Wisdom Sutra in Eight Thousand


Rohit pande , Have a view on many things but happy to thras Sep, 13 2016


Love to know more here, end of the day its a unique independent culture, incorrect for both India or China to claim it as their own, though wonder what do the people of Tibet think ?


Ashima Singh , Exploring Sep, 13 2016


Ah I see what you mean!



Vikram Gupta , Exploring, learning, believing Sep, 13 2016


Tibetan languages are Sino-Tibetan languages. That is to say, Tibetan languages are siblings to Chinese languages.