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Religion

Place to discuss and debate religion, in a civil way.

John , Aug, 24 2016

Banning Burqa and niqab in France, treating humans at par or hurting their religious sentiments


The law, introduced in 2010, makes it illegal for anyone to cover their face in a public place. While it also covers balaclavas and hoods, the ban has been criticised as targeting Muslim women. France adheres to a strict form of secularism, known as laïcité, which is designed to keep religion out of public life. This principle was entrenched by law in 1905, after fierce anti-clerical struggles with the Roman Catholic church. Banning the burqa is an assault on the most basic human right of women having control over their own bodies and minds. I believe that the burqa is not the problem but a symptom of a larger problem of women feeling oppressed by men and pressured to conform to the objectification of women's bodies in Western societies.

http://www.huffingtonpost.in/entry/the-problem-with-banning-the-burqa_b_4940212

The law, introduced in 2010, makes it illegal for anyone to cover their face in a public place. While it also covers balaclavas and hoods, the ban has been criticised as targeting Muslim women. France adheres to a strict form of secularism, known as laïcité, which is designed to keep religion out of public life. This principle was entrenched by law in 1905, after fierce anti-clerical struggles with the Roman Catholic church. Banning the burqa is an assault on the most basic human right of women having control over their own bodies and minds. I believe that the burqa is not the problem but a symptom of a larger problem of women feeling oppressed by men and pressured to conform to the objectification of women's bodies in Western societies. http://www.huffingtonpost.in/entry/the-problem-with-banning-the-burqa_b_4940212

Suhani Singh , Inquisitive snobbish arrogant. I am Golum and Aug, 24 2016


A person being forced to wear a burka is a completely different issue. The culture behind wearing a burka has been around for a very long time. 60 years ago the US had fountains for colored and white folks and colored folks had to sit at the back of the bus. It wasn’t too long before that the great United States was just fine beating the living shit out of people in the cotton fields if they didn’t pick fast enough. Before we point our finger and Judge other people and cultures let’s take our fine-tuned pointing finger and turn it back onto our self.

Things dont change overnight. What we cannot do is to take away are ability to choose for our self. Creating laws for every daily detail of our lives is extremely dangerous. What I was an early teen I made bad racial jokes. Not because I was a bad person. Because I didn’t know better. Over time I learned it hurt people. I didn’t need a law to change the type of person I was. I needed other people to guide me. I needed to learn about other cultures.

A person being forced to wear a burka is a completely different issue. The culture behind wearing a burka has been around for a very long time. 60 years ago the US had fountains for colored and white folks and colored folks had to sit at the back of the bus. It wasn’t too long before that the grea


Albert , Jack of none but master of all Aug, 26 2016


Its not the clothes themselves, its the symbolism of female oppression that they represent that is unacceptable.



swati , Aug, 24 2016


The validity of a claim of free choice where that choice is to deny one's identity is stupid. How many men feel that it is immodest to show their faces? How many men feel it is their duty to hide themselves so that women may not be tempted at the sight of them? How many men make themselves responsible for the way someone else behaves towards them when they have done nothing except show their face?

The validity of a claim of free choice where that choice is to deny one's identity is stupid. How many men feel that it is immodest to show their faces? How many men feel it is their duty to hide themselves so that women may not be tempted at the sight of them? How many men make themselves responsib


Vassal Shergil , Aug, 26 2016


Clearly it is draconian to try and control what people wear, but on both sides of the debate that is exactly what is happening. The question, therefore, is which is the lesser of two evils? However hard the short-term pain, which approach will benefit secular society most in the long run?



Malik , An engineer turned into a student of conflict Aug, 26 2016


If a woman wants to cover her body at the beach, whether you like it or not, that's for her to decide.


Saloni , Aug, 24 2016


People should be free to wear what they want, but i also see this outward display of religion as the equivalent of showing a finger at non Muslims and my gut reaction is to see it as an act of intimidation. Especially since I find there are a number of countries where the headscarf was barely worn forty years ago but where it is now commonplace-which would seem contrary to the modernisation of those countries. The deaf part of me sees them as pretty bloody rude-because one is deprived of the opportunity to lip read any speaker wearing the full veil.Or to see the expression of the face. The atheist in me sees all forms of dress associated with religion as potentially offensive, depending upon the attitude of the religion in question to non believers. As a woman I cannot see why any woman would want to wear this-other than to avoid sunburn-if not forced. But as a woman, I cannot see why any woman has anything to do with the religions made up by and devised for the benefit of men.

People should be free to wear what they want, but i also see this outward display of religion as the equivalent of showing a finger at non Muslims and my gut reaction is to see it as an act of intimidation. Especially since I find there are a number of countries where the headscarf was barely worn f


Sunaina , Aug, 24 2016


Forbidding a religious expression goes against the principles of secularism, people wearing burqa have no problem with carrying identity cards if necessary for security reasons so where is the problem? If you have no problem with your women wearing bikinis or going uncovered in the streets, you should not have a problem with women being covered completely, let them have a choice. secular countries should not have dress codes or question a woman's choice of dress if you were to follow secularism that you strongly advocate.

Forbidding a religious expression goes against the principles of secularism, people wearing burqa have no problem with carrying identity cards if necessary for security reasons so where is the problem? If you have no problem with your women wearing bikinis or going uncovered in the streets, you shou


Ashat , Aug, 24 2016


Nowhere in the holy Qoran is a stipulation that a woman should cover her face. It is an invention of chauvinistic men who wanted to keep women in their place. In the past, niqab was worn only by women in the Arab Peninsula, with the rest of the arab women wearing less restrictive covers. If arab women can do what they want in their countries of origin. But they cannot shove their beliefs down the throats of Europeans who have different cultures and live by different norms. The issue is not an issue of freedom of expression or belief but more of when in Rome do as the Romans do

Nowhere in the holy Qoran is a stipulation that a woman should cover her face. It is an invention of chauvinistic men who wanted to keep women in their place. In the past, niqab was worn only by women in the Arab Peninsula, with the rest of the arab women wearing less restrictive covers. If arab wom


Pranav , Aug, 24 2016


People fail to distinguish between religion and religious rituals. The former is a practice of repenting over ones wrong doings, correcting oneself, resolving to be a better human being the next day, and being careful not to cause inconvenience to others in the name of personal freedom. There is much more than that. It defines a process of becoming on the other hand, the ritual practices are external display of one's religious affiliation, and they do not guarantee that a person practising rituals is truly religious.

People fail to distinguish between religion and religious rituals. The former is a practice of repenting over ones wrong doings, correcting oneself, resolving to be a better human being the next day, and being careful not to cause inconvenience to others in the name of personal freedom. There is muc


Vijay Arur , Aug, 26 2016


I have a tummy, I like to cover up on the beach as I feel more comfortable than having my belly hang out. If I wear a long sleeved rash vest and long bottoms with a hat how is that really different to covering up with a burkini? Seeing an over weight woman is more terrifying than these outfits.



Ashish Kulkarni , Aug, 24 2016


Symbols or cloths have meanings and history. The Sikh turban is not symbols of oppression and hence do not bother anyone. Now that Hitler perverted the swastik, holy and loved for thousands of years, Hindus rarely flaunt it in the west knowing it may inadvertently upset those who suffered from the Holocaust. Adapting to local feelings and understanding their fears was important, not insisting on some symbol, albeit loved. That is integration and respect for their new country, which they deliberately chose to inhabit.

Symbols or cloths have meanings and history. The Sikh turban is not symbols of oppression and hence do not bother anyone. Now that Hitler perverted the swastik, holy and loved for thousands of years, Hindus rarely flaunt it in the west knowing it may inadvertently upset those who suffered from the H